How Audrey Frank Got Started as a Missionary and Author

Audrey Frank is a missionary and an author. Her recent book, Covered Glory (affiliate link) shares how deepening our understanding of honor and shame can not only deepen our relationships with God, but also help us to reach our Muslim neighbors.

Contact Info

Where and what people do you primarily serve?

In the United States and Internationally

How do you serve those people?

I train Christians how to reach Muslims with the Gospel, particularly how to understand the Islamic worldview of honor and shame and its impact on the Muslim woman's journey to Christ.


When did you begin to realize that you had a heart for missions or ministry?

When I was nine years old.

How and when did God lead you to this? How did you recognize His call?

I was nine years old when a doctor who worked in Nigeria came to my church and showed slides of the children he served. I knew deep in my heart I wanted to do the same. I asked him afterwards if I could go back with him and help. He said, “Start praying now, and one day God will take you there.” I did.

After university, I left for Africa with my husband to work first among an Islamic tribe in the east, then after that to the closed Muslim north.

Did you have a clear and measurable goal for ministry?

Rather than counting conversions, I measured my success by whether or not Muslims in my life were moving toward the Messiah or away from Him. If because of my Gospel witness they were moving toward him, I was successful.

The power to redeem another is Christ's alone. My clear and measurable goal was and still is to bring others into contact with the truths of the Bible within my first few interactions with them. Former Muslims consistently report that it was when they read the Bible that they were transformed and convinced they must follow the Messiah Jesus.

I make it my goal to expose them to the Bible as soon as possible in whatever way the Holy Spirit leads, and I have had so many immeasurably valuable encounters with Muslim friends as they have discovered Biblical truth for the first time.

What would you do differently if you were starting today?

I would arm myself with an understanding of the honor-shame worldview and how it impacts my presentation of the Gospel to Muslims. I did not know what I know now when I started out, and I wish I had. Also, I would depend more on God to do the work of redemption, not myself.

I thought so much depended on me in the early days. Now, over twenty years later, I see that the power of salvation and the work of grace in human hearts is God's. He invites me to work with Him, but the power to save anyone is His because He alone knows their souls' great worth, not me.

Now that I understand this better, I enjoy my relationships with Muslim friends so much more. They are people, not projects. As they learn about the Messiah, I do too.

Henri Nouwen called this “reverse mission”, when those we minister to are used of the Lord to minister to us and grow us in discipleship.

How do you connect with new partners or supporters and stay connected with your existing partners?

Through my website, www.audreyfrank.com, Facebook, and Twitter (@audreycfrank)

What books, tools, or resources that are important to doing what you do?

I was mentored by Roland Muller, the author of the foundational world view book titled “Honor and Shame: Unlocking the Door“. His book was for a long time the only tool my husband and I had to understand the Islamic world view of honor and shame.

Then others added to the knowledge base: Jayson Georges, “The 3-D Gospel,” “Ministering in Honor-Shame Cultures”. My own book, “Covered Glory: The Face of Honor and Shame in the Muslim World” is a unique look at the Muslim woman's journey from shame to honor as she encounters the Messiah.

How do you get ongoing training and coaching?

I attend annual training conferences as well as the Honor-Shame Conference (honorshame.com) as a learner and a presenter. I also attend webinars pertinent to my subject.

Through a vast network of practitioners like myself in the Muslim world, I receive ongoing training at events like the Abide Congress through Vision 5:9 as well as reading voraciously anything that has to do with honor and shame. I am fortunate to be coached and mentored by Roland Muller, Jayson Georges, Dr. Jackson Wu, and Werner Mischke, all of whom have contributed significantly to our current understanding of the honor-shame world view and its impact on Gospel witness.

I am also a fellow with The Truth Collective (TheTruthCollective.org), where I receive regular training as well as accountability with the other fellows.

What first steps or training would you recommend that others just starting out?

I highly recommend praying for Muslims in your community first of all. Pray that God would bring a Muslim into your life if you do not have a relationship with one.

To gain a solid understanding of Islam and how to build relationships with Muslims, I highly recommend the Bridges Study with Crescent Project (www.crescentproject.org). Their training conferences are also very helpful to people on all levels of experience.

The Truth Collective (TheTruthCollective.org) is another excellent resource where Christian women can learn how to engage in truth with Muslim women. And, read my book:)

What is a critical mindset or perspective regarding listening, teachability, flexibility, grace, etc?

Remember that the Gospel encompasses all world views. Our way is not the only way to communicate it or understand it. We miss so much because of our different world views when doing ministry cross-culturally, especially with Muslims.

Arming ourselves with just a small amount of understanding of world view will help us stop and listen before reacting and drawing conclusions, slow down and see the deeper meaning behind confusing behavior, and most importantly, help us start the Gospel conversation from a place that might be better understood by our listener.

Knowing what you know now, would you do it all again?

Absolutely, a million times over. Well, maybe not a million… I don't want to delay the day I get to see Jesus face to face:)

Disclosure of Material Connection: Some of the links in the post above are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, I will receive an affiliate commission. Regardless, I only recommend products or services I use personally and believe will add value to my readers. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”
How Jean Johnson Got Started as a Missionary

How Jean Johnson Got Started as a Missionary

After ministry experiences in high school and training in college, Jean Johnson began ministering to Southeast Asians in Minneapolis, Minnesota. While you might think that would prepare her for her first experiences overseas, she discovered that some of the things she thought were assets actually held her back.

After years of ministry experience, she wrote a book, “We are Not the Hero: A Missionary's Guide to Sharing Christ, Not a Culture of Dependency.” Here's more about her and how she got started.

Where and what people do you primarily serve?
We serve the sent, the senders, the trainers, and the recipients of mission efforts.

How do you serve those people?
Come alongside this global community to create a culture of dignity, sustainability, and multiplication in Great Commission efforts.

When did you begin to realize that you had a heart for missions or ministry?
In high school, I had a rather rapid and intentional connection to first generation S.E. Asian refugees who came to Minneapolis. I befriended them and asked to learn their story, while my peers avoided them due to their differences.

How and when did God lead you to this? How did you recognize His call?
In college, I asked God questions such as, “Who learns the Cambodian, Hmong, Vietnamese culture to such a degree they can make the good news make sense to that people group?” This is a dangerous question to ask God. He led me to prepare myself for such a task. At this point, I changed my major from the social sciences to cross-cultural communications.

Did you have a clear and measurable goal for ministry?
My goal was reformed and refined with experience. I believe I have landed back at the beginning in some ways: make disciples who have the vision and capability to makes disciples in their God-given context.

What would you do differently if you were starting today?
I would NOT plant or model the Western church in places like Cambodia.

How do you connect with new partners or supporters and stay connected with your existing partners?
The organization I direct, Five Stones Global, blogs intentionally about dignity, sustainability, and multiplication, which encourages, equips, and challenges partners and supporters. Otherwise we send newsletters and other forms of communication. Our website is intriguing and informative: fivestonesglobal.org

What books, tools, or resources that are important to doing what you do?
We Are Not The Hero is popular. We are coming out with a Participant's Guide and Videos the middle of Jan. 2018. Additionally, a new workbook is headed your way: Standing on Our Own Feet: Strengthening Church Dignity in Our Global Mission Efforts

How do you get ongoing training and coaching?
Our speciality is coaching and training based on our tagline: DAY 1 affects DAY 100 and We Are Not The Hero. If desired, please visit fivestonesglobal.org or email admin@fivestonesglobal.org

What first steps or training would you recommend that others just starting out?
Our DAY 1 affects DAY 100 tagline reveals that the beginning is important. We will either inhibit or strengthen local dignity, sustainability, or multiplication as we lay foundations. If you are interested in Five stones Global training, we suggest your start with the DAY 1 affects DAY 100 Introductory workshop or go through the We Are Not The Hero book, guide, and video with a small group or team.

What is a critical mindset or perspective regarding listening, teachability, flexibility, grace, etc?
Globalization has fooled us into thinking the cross-cultural work is no longer our role. So, we organize and conceptualize the mission task based on our culture, standard of living, and church experience. In the end, we end up with people striving to be American Christians.

A critical mindset to overcome this is to take on the apostle Paul's attitude and approach: “And so it was with me, brothers and sisters. When I came to you, I did not come with eloquence or human wisdom as I proclaimed to you the testimony about God. For I resolved to know nothing while I was with you except Jesus Christ and him crucified. I came to you in weakness with great fear and trembling. My message and my preaching were not with wise and persuasive words, but with a demonstration of the Spirit’s power, so that your faith might not rest on human wisdom, but on God’s power” (1 Cor. 2:1-5).

Knowing what you know now, would you do it all again?
I would do it all again, but set a goal to be a humble learner before a doer in cross-cultural work; and count learning as ministry.

Jean Johnson

Jean Johnson

Missionary, Servant

Disclosure of Material Connection: Some of the links in the post above are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, I will receive an affiliate commission. Regardless, I only recommend products or services I use personally and believe will add value to my readers. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

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How Beth Ann Watkins Got Started as a Missionary

How Beth Ann Watkins Got Started as a Missionary

Beth Watkins has had an interesting journey that's included quick exits from countries, a cross-cultural marriage, and more. Here's how she got started.

Name + Contact Info

Where and what people do you primarily serve?
I spent 6 years working in closed countries in North Africa and in South Sudan working with vulnerable and marginalized populations, specifically street children and refugees. Because of health reasons, we've now resettled back in the US, and I'm currently looking for employment and volunteer opportunities to continue working with marginalized and immigrant populations.

How do you serve those people?
I worked with small local NGOs in various capacities, but my focus was primarily on job skills and development, particularly looking to help people not have to engage in dangerous activities to generate income, and focus on helping people be self sufficient.

When did you begin to realize that you had a heart for missions or ministry?
I was so intrigued by the world outside of the US ever since I was a kid, and about high school I really started considering ministry and life overseas as a vocation. By the time I was 17 or so that set my trajectory, and worked toward a life of ministry overseas.

How and when did God lead you to this? How did you recognize His call?
It was kind of gradual, and also kind of all at once. I can trace it back through books I read, experiences in church, pleading 16-year-old journal entries. Just all along the way as I grew in my faith, and grew into my faith, I knew I wanted to serve God with my life, and this ended up being what made the most sense to me.

Did you have a clear and measurable goal for ministry?
No, I just wanted to be faithful. That led me to North Africa and I couldn't have been happier about it.

What would you do differently if you were starting today?
Thats a tough question for me at the moment. I'm currently having health struggles–it's why I had to leave the field–and they are a result of long-term stress and trauma. We still don't know the long-term affects, or how this will affect our lives down the way. So while I wish we'd had more support, and that there was more discussion about these sorts of costs for eager young people going into missions, I don't have any regrets.

Many of the challenging circumstances we faced were completely unforeseen, and all we could keep doing was just take the next step, not knowing what else was ahead. While I'm deeply sad about leaving the field, and still grappling with health issues as a result of the life I choose–doing my best to follow where God led me–I'm not sure what I could have or would choose to have done differently. What I've seen and experienced have changed me in profound ways, and while much of it was painful, I know I'm better for it. That, and I met my husband overseas, and that does make all of the rest seem worth it!

How do you connect with new partners or supporters and stay connected with your existing partners?
While I'm no longer on support, I do still blog avidly as I did while I was overseas to keep up with supporters, and I still send out a regular newsletter about recognizing our neighbors and loving them, and even our enemies, wherever we find ourselves.

What books, tools, or resources that are important to doing what you do?
I find relationships are always the best resource and tool, and reading everything you can by people who have gone before you, and also about the places and histories of the people in the places where you are are so important. Now that we find ourselves back in the US, I am trying to read everything I can from people in America whose contexts and experience are very different from mine, as a middle-class white woman. I think wherever you are, whatever you do, it's important to recognize you can only see so much from your perspective, and it's so important to seek out the voices of those who can help you understand what you can't or don't see.

What first steps or training would you recommend that others just starting out?
Get as much training as you can, and spend time really developing skills. I was pretty young and bright-eyed when I went overseas, and though God was very gracious and I found my feet while I was there, I do wish I'd taken more time developing real skills for overseas work. Which can be many things depending on what you're hoping to do, such as first aid training, ESL, grant-writing. Read books like “When Helping Hurts,” and “A Smoldering Wick.” Get and take advice from those on the ground, plan to take time to study language–it really does make a huge difference.

What is a critical mindset or perspective regarding listening, teachability, flexibility, grace, etc?
Take the posture of a learner, always. Be willing to listen first, especially in your first few years, but really at every opportunity. No matter how much you know, you know less than the locals, less than your colleagues, and really be ok with that. Even in my last 2 years overseas as I was supervising a multi-cultural team of 7, I always asked questions, always listened first, always asked advice. This doesn't mean hesitating to act, but as you do, recognize you alway wear your own cultural glasses that mean you can't always see things in the best way. Also, love people! Find people to love, and it makes the rest of it all much easier.

Knowing what you know now, would you do it all again?
Absolutely. (Though I probably wouldn't recommend to others the exact path I trod!)

Beth Watkins

Beth Watkins

Missionary: Recently Retired

Disclosure of Material Connection: Some of the links in the post above are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, I will receive an affiliate commission. Regardless, I only recommend products or services I use personally and believe will add value to my readers. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

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How Matthew Meyer Got Started as a Missionary to Poland

How Matthew Meyer Got Started as a Missionary to Poland

Matthew Meyer has made some pretty extreme regional changes, moving from Alaska to the southern United States. Now he's a missionary who recently moved to Poland. Here's how he got started.

Name + Contact Info

Where and what people do you primarily serve?
Krakow, Poland, Polish People

How do you serve those people?
Anything from street evangelism, church planting, community outreaches, teaching english, volunteering in orphanages, and one on one discipleship.

When did you begin to realize that you had a heart for missions or ministry?
It was in college when I had the opportunity to go on a 5 week mission trip to east Asia.

How and when did God lead you to this? How did you recognize His call?
At first it just seemed like something as a Christian I was suppose to do, but quickly during my time over there God showed my the vast amount of lostness and the lack of access to the gospel.

Did you have a clear and measurable goal for ministry?
Yes, I believe God has called me to be in church planting in an international context, not just one church, but however many God chooses to allow me to be a part of.

What would you do differently if you were starting today?
Coming to faith a little bit later in life (when I was 18, now I'm 26) I wish I would have taken scripture memorization more seriously. I am working on it constantly, but having the ability to hide scripture in your heart that way I believe is not only a valuable to for evangelism, but personal closeness with Christ.

How do you connect with new partners or supporters and stay connected with your existing partners?
Many times it is through mutual contacts that I meet new people. As far as existing contacts we do monthly email updates and bi-yearly video updates. Close contacts we try and do video chats with almost every month at least.

What books, tools, or resources that are important to doing what you do?
There are many great tools and books out there, but for me my best resource has been learning from people that have been on the field much longer than me. We have many teammates that have been on the ground in Poland and other parts of Europe much longer than us, their wisdom and experience is invaluable.

How do you get ongoing training and coaching?
The IMB has many avenues for this, such as assigned mentors and supervisors. I have the privilege of working directly under the Affinity leader for Europe, Mark Edworthy. He has been a valued friend and mentor in many areas.

What first steps or training would you recommend that others just starting out?
Seek God's will in all things, try to identify how exactly God may get you wherever He may be taking you. Take every opportunity to be heavily involved in ministry where you are now, don't wait to become a “missionary” to start ministry, it does not work that way.

What is a critical mindset or perspective regarding listening, teachability, flexibility, grace, etc?
All these things are some of the most important attributes and skills you must have to be successful. Everything changes when you move into a new culture, being flexible and teachable allows learning a new culture to go much smoother and having grace for others and yourself will help you grow faster then you could imagine. Always be able to laugh at yourself, don't be too serious, especially in language and culture acquisition.

Knowing what you know now, would you do it all again?
I may only be 8 months in, but absolutely yes!

Matthew Meyer

Matthew Meyer

Missionary to Poland

Disclosure of Material Connection: Some of the links in the post above are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, I will receive an affiliate commission. Regardless, I only recommend products or services I use personally and believe will add value to my readers. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

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How Terry Hoggard Got Started as a Missionary

Terry Hoggard has served in Europe as a missionary, has helped create networks of churches supporting each other and growing together and he's now working with Convoy of Hope. This is how he got started.

Name + Contact Info

Where and what people do you primarily serve?
Serve globally with Convoy of Hope International and in International Church development

How do you serve those people?

  • Crafting strategies
  • Coaching synergy
  • Creating solutions

When did you begin to realize that you had a heart for missions or ministry?
In 1972 I was impacted, in 1982 I was profoundly impacted.

How and when did God lead you to this? How did you recognize His call?
On a mission trip to Columbia in 1972, as the result of divine awareness in 1982.

Did you have a clear and measurable goal for ministry?
Yes … to passionately engage with progressive leaders to co-create a change process that will inspire and to develop strategic initiatives that promote networking opportunities.​

What would you do differently if you were starting today?
Be more aware of the organic development that comes thru obedience and excellence.

How do you connect with new partners or supporters and stay connected with your existing partners?
By building covenant, communicating intentionally and creating meaningful connection.

What books, tools, or resources that are important to doing what you do?
Identify and connect with like-minded and right-spirited individuals.

How do you get ongoing training and coaching?
I pursued coaching certifications and receive training “life on life” engagement.

What first steps or training would you recommend that others just starting out?
Take the time to build a solid academic foundation … and keep building!

What is a critical mindset or perspective regarding listening, teachability, flexibility, grace, etc?
Awareness of the possibility that people bring to us if only they can be heard.

Knowing what you know now, would you do it all again?
Absolutely … and love it all the more!

Terry Hoggard

Terry Hoggard

Missionary, Vice President: Convoy of Hope International Program

Disclosure of Material Connection: Some of the links in the post above are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, I will receive an affiliate commission. Regardless, I only recommend products or services I use personally and believe will add value to my readers. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

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How Dylan Dodson got Started as a Church Planter at New City Church in Raleigh, NC

Dylan Dodson is a pastor, podcaster, and church planter in Raleigh, NC. God has been incredibly faithful to him over the years. Here's how he got started.

Name + Contact Info

Where and what people do you primarily serve?
New City Church in Raleigh NC

How do you serve those people?
Lead Pastor

When did you begin to realize that you had a heart for missions or ministry?
Not until after my father died when I was 19. Up until that point, I never really thought or had a desire to go into vocational ministry.

How and when did God lead you to this? How did you recognize His call?
Difficult to answer briefly :). Biggest turning point was a few weeks after my father died, I really felt that pastoring/church planting was what God was leading me to be a part of.

Did you have a clear and measurable goal for ministry?
The vision for New City Church is to be actively reaching 50,000 people by 2040. We hope that God would allow us to be part of something like this through the planting of churches, so that collectively, through us and the churches we send out, we are reaching 50,000 together.

What would you do differently if you were starting today?
So many things! I don't think I can answer this briefly!

How do you connect with new partners or supporters and stay connected with your existing partners?
Since we begin the church planting process a couple of years back, we have built an email list. That and social media is how most people who aren't a part of New City Church stay up to date with what we are doing.

What books, tools, or resources that are important to doing what you do?
We are part of the Acts 29 church planting network. Community is so important! We have been blessed with some great people as well at New City Church. I've read too many books on pastoring/church planting to really select just a few. I would say always being willing to learn and grow from others is key.

How do you get ongoing training and coaching?
Through Acts 29, as well as local pastor gatherings I am a part of in my area.

What first steps or training would you recommend that others just starting out?
For church planting. A lot of people say they want to do church planting, but aren't willing to submit themselves to a local church and serve faithfully there (everyone wants to skip right to planting a church). I have yet to see someone plant a healthy church where they did not first serve somewhere else. With that, find a network or denomination or somewhere to get trained and assessed. You cannot plant a church on your own.

What is a critical mindset or perspective regarding listening, teachability, flexibility, grace, etc?
Realize you don't have it all figured out. Be willing to try new things and fail, and also be willing to take wise counsel. Also don't think (because it isn't true) that there are no other churches where you are planting that don't really love Jesus or “do church” the right way. Learn from those in your area who have been doing ministry there longer than you!

Knowing what you know now, would you do it all again?
Great question. Church planting is one of those things (like most journeys in life), where if you saw what you would have to go through and deal with before you had to deal with it, it would be really hard to commit to doing it. I would certainly do some things differently if I had to do it all over again, that would hopefully make the process a little sooner. At the end of the day, if people are meeting Jesus as a result of what we are doing, all the difficulty in the world is worth it.

Dylan Dodson

Dylan Dodson

Pastor, Church Planter

Disclosure of Material Connection: Some of the links in the post above are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, I will receive an affiliate commission. Regardless, I only recommend products or services I use personally and believe will add value to my readers. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

Become a patron!

The Engaging Missions Show is made possible, in part, by generous donations from listeners like you. If you'd like to know more about how you can be involved, visit our Patron Page.

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